Advertisement

Find answers, ask questions, and connect with our community around the world.

  • The United States needs to overhaul its law-enforcement system

    Posted by btomba_77 on December 15, 2014 at 2:12 pm

    [link=http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21636033-united-states-needs-overhaul-its-law-enforcement-system-americas-police-trial]http://www.economist.com/…-americas-police-trial[/link]
     
    This is a bit of a long read, but I think quite on target.
     

     
     
    American blacks feel that the criminal-justice system works against them, rather than for them. Some 59% of white Americans have confidence in the police, but only 37% of blacks do. This is poisonous: if any racial group distrusts the enforcers of the law, it erodes the social contract. It also hurts Americas moral standing in the world But racial division, rooted as it is in Americas past, is not easily mitigated.
     
    There is, however, another prism through which to examine these grim stories: the use of excessive violence by the state. It, too, has complex origins, but quite a lot of them may be susceptible to reform. [b]In many cases Americans simply do not realize how capricious and violent their law-enforcement system is compared with those of other rich countries. [/b] It could be changed in ways that would make America safer, and fairer to both blacks and whites.
     
     

     
    [b]Dont shoot[/b] 
     Americas police are motivated to be rapacious: laws allow them to seize assets they merely suspect are linked to a crime and then spend the proceeds on equipment. And, while other nations have focused on community policing, some American police have become paramilitary, equipping themselves with grenade launchers and armoured cars. 
    Above all, American law enforcement is unusually lethal: even the partial numbers show that the police shot and killed at least 458 people last year. By comparison, those in England and Wales shot and killed no one.
     
    [b]Fewer armoured cars, more body cameras[/b]
    mericas murder rate is several times that of other rich countries. And the vastly disparate rate at which policemen shoot young black men is not simply a matter of prejudice. Roughly 29% of Americans shot by the police are black, but so are about 42% of cop killers whose race is known.
    If America did not have 300m guns in circulation, much of this would change. That, sadly, is not going to happen soon. But there are other ways to make the police less violent.
     
    The first is transparency. Every police force should report how many people it kills to the federal government. And if communities want to buy gadgets, they should give their police body cameras. These devices deter bad behaviour on both sides and make investigations easier.  
    The second is accountability:  If an officer is accused of a crime, the decision as to whether to indict him may rest with a local prosecutor who works closely with the local police, attends barbecues with them and depends on the support of the police union if he or she wants to be re-elected. Or it may rest with a local grand jury of civilians, who hear only what the prosecutor wants them to hear. To improve accountability, complaints should be heard by independent arbiters, brought in from outside.
     
    The third, and hardest, is reversing the militarisation of the police.  
    Too many see their job as to wage war on criminals; too many poor neighbourhoods see the police as an occupying army. The police need more training and less weaponry: for a start, the Pentagon should stop handing out military kit to neighbourhood cops.
    In many ways America remains a model for other countries. Its economic engine has roared back to life. Its values are ones which decent people should want to spread. Yet its criminal-justice system, the backbone of any society, is deeply flawed. Changing it will be hard; but change is overdue.
     

     
    I agree with all of that wholeheartedly.
     
     
     
     
     

    btomba_77 replied 1 year, 3 months ago 6 Members · 29 Replies
  • 29 Replies
  • ruszja

    Member
    December 15, 2014 at 4:05 pm

    Quote from dergon channeling the economist

    Americas police are motivated to be rapacious: laws allow them to seize assets they merely suspect are linked to a crime and then spend the proceeds on equipment.

     
    Asset seizures that benefit a particular department should be straight out illegal. If assets are seized due to link to criminal activity, they need to go into the general fund for the respective state. Lots of highway-robbery happening under the guise of the ‘war on whatever’, most of it in the south.
     

    And, while other nations have focused on community policing, some American police have become paramilitary, equipping themselves with grenade launchers and armoured cars. 

     
    One just needs to look at the footage of the north Hollywood shootout to see why police in the US has decided to level the playing field.
     

    Above all, American law enforcement is unusually lethal: even the partial numbers show that the police shot and killed at least 458 people last year. By comparison, those in England and Wales shot and killed no one.

     
    Sure, and police in brasil  shot 2000 people. The US has areas that are more brasil than the W1 postcode.
     

    And the vastly disparate rate at which policemen shoot young black men is not simply a matter of prejudice. Roughly 29% of Americans shot by the police are black, but so are about 42% of cop killers whose race is known.

     
    Yes, and 49,000 law enforcement officers were assaulted in the line of duty in 2013. Out of 74 cases were officers were assaulted with knives or guns, 69 offenders were male and 40 of them black. Assaulting police officers with knives and guns is what puts you at the greatest risk of getting shot, if the population of people who do that has blacks over-represented by a factor of 9, a 29% rate seems quite reasonable.
     

    And if communities want to buy gadgets, they should give their police body cameras. These devices deter bad behaviour on both sides and make investigations easier.  

     
    Do they ? Garners killing was recorded, still no bill. Maybe it’ll deter bad behavior, it will also show lots of bad behavior by individuals the police deals with. The video in Garners death also showed the cop being flung around like a rag-doll, who knows maybe that allowed the jury to understand why he didn’t let go the second the big guy was on the ground.
     

    If an officer is accused of a crime, the decision as to whether to indict him may rest with a local prosecutor who works closely with the local police, attends barbecues with them and depends on the support of the police union if he or she wants to be re-elected. Or it may rest with a local grand jury of civilians, who hear only what the prosecutor wants them to hear. To improve accountability, complaints should be heard by independent arbiters, brought in from outside.

     
    Both the Garner and the Brown cases were decided by grand juries who don’t give a hoot about the DAs prospects of getting re-elected. Also, in larger prosecutors offices, decisions to indict are usually not in the hands of the elected DA but rather one of the career ADAs who handles violent crimes. That person is a public servant who will have a job come rain come shine, regardless of the prosecutor (and if he doesn’t like the new prosecutor, he usually has a job waiting for him in the largest local defense firm).
     
    But yes, investigations of use of deadly force should have outside oversight, certainly a police agency from outside the jurisdiction to keep an eye on things. Maybe even an independent prosecutor to deal with police incidents statewide.
    But that shouldn’t stop at police. One of our local inbred registered sex offenders robbed, raped and murdered a local young lady on a jogging trail. There was evidence that he was lying in wait and prepared to dispose of her body. You would think murder 1, aggravating circumstances, life without parole open and shut case. But no, a jury of his inbred relatives gave him a murder 2 conviction which will put him back on the street in 12 years.
     

    for a start, the Pentagon should stop handing out military kit to neighbourhood cops.

     
    All those ‘military’ vehicles shown in the Ferguson unrest were Lemco Bear and Bearcat trucks. Bought new from the factory, not obtained through surplus.
     

    In many ways America remains a model for other countries. Its economic engine has roared back to life. Its values are ones which decent people should want to spread. Yet its criminal-justice system, the backbone of any society, is deeply flawed. Changing it will be hard; but change is overdue.

    Sure, there is room for improvement.
     
     
     
    Btw. officer Groman is in stable condition and should make a full recovery. But who cares.

    • kayla.meyer_144

      Member
      December 15, 2014 at 5:26 pm

      Not so interesting factoids that have little to nothing to do with the issues. Rag-doll? That rag-doll killed Garner by choking. I think I’d take my chances with Chucky.
       
      There are too many cases of police over-reaction to be kind, & dead unarmed civilians who were not threatening the police. Garner was not threatening, he was passively begging to breathe. But he is the one who is dead.

  • kayla.meyer_144

    Member
    December 19, 2014 at 3:35 am

    [font=”arial black,avant garde”][size=”4″][b]There is no freestanding constitutional right to be free from malicious prosecution.[/b][/size][/font]
     
    [link=http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-watch/wp/2014/12/18/your-police-raid-outrage-of-the-day/]http://www.washingtonpost…id-outrage-of-the-day/[/link]
     

    Another data point supporting the argument that too many police agencies just arent adequately equipped to deal with the mentally ill.
     
    Chadwick, who hadnt broken a single law when SWAT burst through his door, was taken to the Ft. Bend County Jail with a fractured nose, bruised ribs and whats proven to be permanent hearing loss.

    He was held in an isolation cell for two full days.

    Instead of apologizing to this man and asking let us see what we can do to help you to make you whole again, they concocted criminal charges against this man, one after another, after another, said Quanell X who believes the prosecution of Chadwick was designed to fend off civil liability.

    Ft. Bend County District Attorney John Healy sought to indict Chadwick on two felony counts of assaulting a police officer, but a Grand Jury said no law was broken.

    Score one for the grand jury. The prosecutor then hit Chadwick with a misdemeanor charge of resisting arrest. He was acquitted, despite the testimony of more than a dozen cops.
     
    Last month, a federal district court judge dismissed every one of Chadwicks claims on summary judgment, finding that the claims either didnt amount to a constitutional violation or that the government entities he sued were protected by sovereign immunity the prosecutor by absolute immunity and the individual officers by qualified immunity. The opinion includes this surreal (but, unfortunately, legally accurate) line:

    There is no freestanding constitutional right to be free from malicious prosecution.

     

    • kaldridgewv2211

      Member
      December 19, 2014 at 6:56 am

      I don’t think the USA and England/Wales are a great camparison of law enforcement.  I don’t think the typical “bobbies” even carry guns.  However, I can also see how black people might be targeted by cops.  The news in Cleveland is now that the “heartless felons” gang has put out orders to kill white police officers in response to all the Tamir Rice and however, else they feel the black community has been slighted.  So you have the same people that feel like they are being targeted, are kind of asking for the CPD to rain down on them like the fist of God.

  • kayla.meyer_144

    Member
    December 19, 2014 at 12:53 pm

    Predatory traffic tickets used to raise revenue, not for public safety.
     
    [link=http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/19/us/missouri-sues-13-st-louis-suburbs-over-predatory-traffic-fines.html]http://www.nytimes.com/20…ory-traffic-fines.html[/link]
     

    When traffic ticketing is used to promote public safety, thats appropriate, Mr. Koster said. When traffic tickets are used to promote revenue, thats inappropriate. Such practices, he said, are predatory.
     
    State law requires towns to report the percentage of general operating revenue that comes from fines for traffic violations, and limits their potential to profit by requiring that proceeds beyond 30 percent be turned over to the state.

     

    • btomba_77

      Member
      January 2, 2015 at 6:54 am

      [link=http://www.npr.org/2015/01/02/374511053/outside-agency-expected-to-probe-cleveland-police-shooting]http://www.npr.org/2015/0…veland-police-shooting[/link]
       
      Cleveland Police will hand the investigation of Tamir Rice shooting to an outside agency.   (Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Department)
       
       
       
       

      • btomba_77

        Member
        July 16, 2015 at 5:04 am

        [url=http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-33531314]
        Obama lays out criminal justice reform plan[/url][/h1]  
         

        President Barack Obama has called for sweeping reforms to the US criminal justice system including curbing the use of solitary confinement and voting rights for felons. He said lengthy mandatory minimum sentences should be reduced – or thrown out entirely.  “Mass incarceration makes our entire country worse off, and we need to do something about it,” he said.
         

         
         
        Speaking to a gathering of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in Philadelphia, Mr Obama discussed investments in education, alternatives to trials and prison job training programs.
         
        Criminal justice reforms have been a subject of rare agreement between Republicans and Democrats in Congress.  He noted that African Americans and Latinos disproportionately make up most of the prison population.  On Monday Mr Obama commuted the sentences of 46 prisoners, many of whom were serving time for non-violent drug offences.

         
         
         

        • ruszja

          Member
          July 16, 2015 at 6:42 am

          Quote from dergon

          [link=http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-33531314]
          Obama lays out criminal justice reform plan[/link]  

          President Barack Obama has called for sweeping reforms to the US criminal justice system including curbing the use of solitary confinement and voting rights for felons. He said lengthy mandatory minimum sentences should be reduced – or thrown out entirely.  “Mass incarceration makes our entire country worse off, and we need to do something about it,” he said.

           
          So in other words, he isn’t going to do a thing about the issues you brought up in your original post.
           
           
           
           
           
          In related news, according to the Baltimore Sun, since April 16th of this year 111 people have been victims of a homicide, 98 of them black, 89 of them male. Nobody except for their famliies knows their names, nobody gives a ####.

          • btomba_77

            Member
            July 16, 2015 at 7:16 am

            Well.. this thread was as close as there was.
             
             
            “Criminal Justice” reform is not the exact same topic as “Law Enforcement” reform.
             
            I can start a new thread if you’d prefer that.

            • btomba_77

              Member
              September 14, 2015 at 4:30 am

              [url=http://www.stltoday.com/forward-through-ferguson-report/pdf_b0865b51-1ec2-5487-9755-
              d617e19e43d9.html]Report[/url] will be released today.      (link to a preview of report)

              [url=http://www.npr.org/2015/09/14/440139685/ferguson-commission-shines-light-on-racially-divided-st-louis] NPR audio report here[/url]

              The commission set out to examine racial and economic gaps through the St. Louis region, and come up with policy recommendations. In their final report, the commission provides an unvarnished look at how a racially divided St. Louis underserves the African-American community.

              _______
              I look forward to a detailed assessment of the issues around inequities in policing and life in the US urban core, a reasoned proposal of actions that should be taken to address the problems, a period of heated debate, and the subsequent complete political unwillingness to actually adopt said recommendations.

              (( See: [url=http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/6545/]Kerner Commission[/url] ))

              • btomba_77

                Member
                July 10, 2016 at 5:03 am

                [i]The Atlantic[/i]: [url=http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/07/is-america-repeating-the-mistakes-of-1968/490568/]Is America Repeating the Mistakes of 1968?  (The Kerner Report confronted a tense nation with data about structural racism throughout the country and made recommendations to solve the problem. But America looked away.)[/url]

                This is not the first time this has happened. When questions over race and policing were front and center in a national debate in 1968, the federal government failed to take the steps necessary to make any changes. The government understood how institutional racism was playing out in the cities and how they exploded into violence, but the electorate instead was seduced by Richard Nixons calls for law and order, as well as an urban crackdown, leaving the problems of institutional racism untouched. Rather than deal with the way that racism was inscribed into American institutions, including the criminal-justice system, the government focused on building a massive carceral state, militarizing police forces, criminalizing small offenses, and living through repeated moments of racial conflict exploding into violence.

                {T}he final Kerner Report was still incredibly hard-hitting: This is our basic conclusion: Our Nation is moving toward two societies, one black, one whiteseparate and unequal. Though the commissioners had softened the language from the first draft, much of the data remained the same and the overall argument was still incredibly powerful. The report focused on institutional racism. This meant that racism was not just a product of bad individuals who believed that African Americans were inferior to white Americans, but that these racial hierarchies were literally embedded in the structure of society.

                The problem today is that politics might once again be moving in the wrong direction, not unlike what happened in 1968. Structural racism has to be addressed, but Obama is a lame-duck president with a Republican Congress that is unwilling to work on any legislative proposal that this White House sends them. The prospects of this Congress making progress on any kind of federal criminal-justice reforms are slim to none. And though Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton has taken a much tougher stand in calling for criminal-justice reform and fighting for racial justice, she does not have an extensive record of dealing with institutional racism …And then theres Trump. …. In the coming months, Trump instead will likely continue to play to the worst racial sentiment in the electorate and use this moment to build support for expanding rather than reforming the way that criminal justice is administered in America.

                The assessment from the Kerner Commission in the 60s already had it pegged, stating that addressing the problem would require programs that were “compassionate, massive, and sustained”.

                As a society we instead went with “stigmatizing, woefully inadequate, and intermittent”.

                • Unknown Member

                  Deleted User
                  July 10, 2016 at 6:59 am

                  OMG this thread is so overdue and necessary! The blue meanies collective actions of stored-up caucasian violence need to be countered immediately by Presidential decree.
                   
                  First off, the blue meanies need to have their guns confiscated and replaced by big loud whistles. The whistles can be used to startle any suspect back to their senses. 
                   
                  All cops need to be federalized. Also, Great American central government needs to hire and unionize 50,000 civil rights lawyers to virtually “ride-along” in every squad car.  It is a shame that the greatest American resource, the young men and women who have chosen to be virtuous lawyers, are underemployed. Greedy doctors arent underemployed right!? 
                   
                  The virtuous attorneys can perform the “ride alongs” with cops by using small two-way monitors. Whenever a blue meanie pulls over a driver he/she must first check in with the ‘ride along” civil right attorney, who will then have override verdict whether to pull over a vehicle.
                   
                  The cops roles are to be expanded to be also social workers going into homes, and even running out to the local stores or restaurants for the community.
                   
                  Federally, everytime a civil rights attorney has more time to contemplate each police action and thinks there shouldnt have been an arrest or God forbid a death, automatic taxes need to be assessed to caucasian tax payers. Also cops are to start registering ‘micro-aggressions” including dirty looks toward minorities.  Fees and taxes will be automatically leaved against each community based on the cumulative number of micro-regressions. If nationally Fox has news content or commentary that is aggressive, federal fines will be automatically be assessed to caucasian tax penalties.
                   
                  Black Lives Matter members are to be federally deputized and allowed to make arrests. Since they are black, they will not need oversight in doing such.
                   
                  Distracting a cop (now federal official) with a false alarm at a house worth more than 400K will now result in the homeowner being charged with a felony and possible jail time, even with the first false alarm. Its about time rich people stopped being ‘serviced/protected” each time an alarm goes off. Home alarms distract too many cops and like guns should be eliminated by good government. Messages about respecting each others property broadcasted as public service announcements should suffice.
                   
                  Drivers pulled over by the cops will be politely asked to fill out “citizen customer service surveys” to rate how pleased or upset they are at cops pulling them over. These surveys will be used to calculate pay and other benefits of each officer. I really think with this one we could lower the blue meanie-black driver death rate!! 

  • btomba_77

    Member
    September 16, 2016 at 5:27 am

    [i]New Yorker[/i]: [url=http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/09/19/why-are-police-unions-blocking-reform]Why are police unions blocking reform[/url]

    Thanks to the bargains theyve struck on wages and benefits, police officers are among the best-paid civil servants. More important, theyve been extraordinarily effective in establishing control over working conditions. All unions seek to insure that their members have due-process rights and arent subject to arbitrary discipline, but police unions have defined working conditions in the broadest possible terms. This position has made it hard to investigate misconduct claims, and to get rid of officers who break the rules.


    Cities dont have to concede so much power to police unions. So why do they? Big-city unions have large membership bases and are generous when it comes to campaign contributions. Neither liberals nor conservatives have been keen to challenge the unions power. Liberals are generally supportive of public-sector unions; some of the worst police departments in the country are in cities, like Baltimore and Oakland, run by liberal mayors. And though conservatives regularly castigate public-sector unions as parasites, they typically exempt the police. Perhaps most crucial, Walker says, police unions can make life very difficult for mayors, attacking them as soft on crime and warning that, unless they get their way, it will go up. The fear of crimewhich is often a code word for racestill has a powerful political impact. As a result, while most unions in the U.S. have grown weaker since the seventies, police unions have grown stronger.
     

    All labor unions represent the interests of the workers against the bosses. But police officers are not like other workers: they have state-sanctioned power of life and death over fellow-citizens. Its hardly unreasonable to demand real oversight in exchange. Union control over police working conditions necessarily entails less control for the public, and that means less transparency and less accountability in cases of police violence. Its long past time we watched the watchmen.  

  • alyaa.rifaie_129

    Member
    September 16, 2016 at 6:54 am

    As for military vehicles, that was what saved all the lives in the Orlando shooting.

    • kayla.meyer_144

      Member
      September 16, 2016 at 10:06 am

      So let me get this straight, because civilians have military “assault” weapons, the police need more military weapons. Tanks maybe? Against civilians?
       
      Sounds like escalation.
       
      So is there a logical limit to either side’s armament?

      • kaldridgewv2211

        Member
        September 16, 2016 at 11:28 am

        for as much as that’s brought up, how often do you see an officer walking around with an AR-15?  I don’t think I’ve even seen one except for maybe some pictures on the news.

        • kayla.meyer_144

          Member
          September 16, 2016 at 11:45 am

          How many times do you see the police driving a military armored vehicle? How many times have you seen a SWAT team in action?
           
          Bad example.

          • kaldridgewv2211

            Member
            September 16, 2016 at 2:10 pm

            I’ve seen neither of those but I’m glad the police have armor, swat teams, and if need be firepower. If you are in the line of fire and a cop pulls you behind an armored vehicle, I think that’d be great that they had the armored vehicle.

            • kayla.meyer_144

              Member
              September 17, 2016 at 4:26 am

              You’ve been in a line of fire in Ohio? Ever?
               
              I’ve worked in some pretty sketchy places and have never been in the line of fire. Never felt I required an armored vehicle to ride in or with me. Maybe today’s climate of fear has something to do with things since the past couple of decades have seen a substantial reduction in crime.
               
              The reason why the police have been in the news lately regarding increased militarism is that once some police have these new toys they want to use and abuse them, to the detriment of some innocent civilians. The police culture is what needs to be adjusted.

              • kayla.meyer_144

                Member
                September 20, 2016 at 4:59 am

                What’s the spin on this going to be about how Crutcher was actually at fault for his own killing. Big black man is enough for you to get killed? As the police says from the helicopter, “Looks like a bad dude too. Must be on something,” and how Crutcher looks like he needs tasering ever though it looks like his arms are in the air and following police commands, again as stated from helicopter.
                 
                [link=http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/20/us/video-released-in-terence-crutchers-killing-by-tulsa-police.html]http://www.nytimes.com/20…g-by-tulsa-police.html[/link]

                The helicopter video shows the same scene from above. Hes got his hands up there for her now, one officer aboard the helicopter can be heard saying. This guy is still walking and following commands.

                Time for a Taser, I think, a second officer in the helicopter can be heard saying.

                I got a feeling thats about to happen, said the first officer, identifed by Mr. Wood as Officer Shelbys husband, Dave Shelby.

                That looks like a bad dude, too, the second officer said. Mr. Crutcher was shot moments later, and the helicopter camera captured footage of him sprawled on the pavement, his shirt stained with blood. A womans voice can be heard yelling over the radio, Shots fired!

                 
                [link=https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2016/09/19/man-fatally-shot-by-tulsa-police-was-unarmed-chief-says-as-disturbing-video-is-released]https://www.washingtonpos…bing-video-is-released[/link]
                 
                 

                • kaldridgewv2211

                  Member
                  September 20, 2016 at 5:50 am

                  on the clip I saw this morning it seemed as if one person used a taser while the other one shot him.  So I’m not sure what actually took him down.  Pretty bad look for the cops, sure looked like he had his hands up the whole time.

              • kaldridgewv2211

                Member
                September 20, 2016 at 5:54 am

                Quote from Frumious

                You’ve been in a line of fire in Ohio? Ever?

                 
                Nope but I’m glad the police have the right equipment to respond.  Rather them have it and not need it, than not have it at all.  There was a time that I don’t think anyone would’ve thought about a mass shooting, or terror attack.  Even the yearly security training we get now talks about what to do in an “active shooter” situation.  Nothing surprises me anymore, just look at this recent round of bombs that were found.  There’s some crazy @$$ people in the world.

                • kayla.meyer_144

                  Member
                  September 20, 2016 at 6:12 am

                  Again, the problem is not that the police have access to military weaponry. The mindset is that they are in hostile enemy country like Iraq and Afghanistan and the enemy are the civilians.
                   
                  So we have many unarmed civilians getting killed by police because they seem to be nothing more than black males.
                   
                   

                  • kaldridgewv2211

                    Member
                    September 20, 2016 at 7:17 am

                    I don’t see it that way.  Some of the shooting I think are justified.  Mike Brown, Tamir Rice, this kid in Columbus.  I side with the officers.  Now there was a guy in Chicago that was obviously gunned down, the one in South Carolina, and even this guy seemed like he wasn’t doing anything.  Shame on the officers.  Even outside of shootings, that Eric Garner thing in NYC shouldn’t have gone down that way.
                     
                    I don’t have the same experience.  I live in the burbs, never had a problem with Police and the overwhelming majority seem to care about their community.  In east Cleveland there are people getting shot every night.  If I were a cop patrolling there I’d want to ride in a tank.  It’s all black on black, seemingly gang related crime.  No one is standing up saying ‘hey gang banger, black lives matter’.

                    • kayla.meyer_144

                      Member
                      September 20, 2016 at 9:25 am

                      “Shame on the officers?”
                       
                      They deserve more than a wagging finger. they deserve justice like a civilian would.
                       
                      As for East Cleveland, not sure how that relates to Crutcher getting killed. Or Eric Garner choked to death for selling loosies. Or Sean Bell. at his bachelor party. Or Charles Kinsey with his arms up. Or any number of shootings and deaths at the hands or police.
                       
                      Not every situation is life threatening for the police.
                       
                       

                    • btomba_77

                      Member
                      April 6, 2021 at 10:11 am

                      [link=https://thehill.com/policy/defense/546682-house-democrats-push-biden-to-limit-transfer-of-military-grade-gear-to-police]House Democrats push Biden to limit transfer of military-grade gear to police

                      [/link]

                      In a letter to be sent to the White House on Tuesday afternoon, the lawmakers, led by Rep. [link=https://thehill.com/people/hank-johnson]Hank Johnson[/link] (D-Ga.), argue an executive order is a reasonable step towards demilitarizing our police forces while preserving the safety of our communities.
                       
                      Decades of militarization of our nations law enforcement have led to some police departments looking more like an occupying army than a community-based regulatory arm of state and local government, the 29 Democrats wrote in the letter, a draft of which was obtained by The Hill.
                       
                      Our neighborhoods need to be protected, including from dangers posed by the militarization of police, they added. This reasonable step falls squarely within your executive authority as president of the United States.
                      [/QUOTE]
                       

  • btomba_77

    Member
    January 15, 2023 at 4:25 pm

    Pittsburgh police chief says hes going to ignore a city ordinance barring cops from pulling people over for trivial traffic offenses, in part because its hurting officer morale.

    [link=https://www.wesa.fm/politics-government/2023-01-12/pittsburgh-police-resume-secondary-traffic-stops-despite-city-ordinance-against-them]https://www.wesa.fm/polit…ordinance-against-them[/link]

    [h1][b]Pittsburgh Police resume secondary traffic stops despite city ordinance against them[/b][/h1]

    The [u][link=https://pittsburgh.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=5208670&GUID=B5AEC7AF-6845-4012-8B7D-3462C66597FA&Options=ID%7CText%7C&Search=traffic+stops]city ordinance[/link][/u] prohibits Pittsburgh police officers from pulling over a motorist if the primary reason is one of eight minor traffic violations. (Officers could pull over a motorist for another reason and still issue a ticket for a secondary infraction.) Advocates argued that racial bias can lead to disproportionate enforcement against Black and Latino residents. The ordinance was an attempt to mitigate those disparities modeled on [u][link=https://www.npr.org/2021/11/08/1052957246/why-philadelphia-has-banned-low-level-traffic-stops]similar legislation in Philadelphia[/link][/u].

    Acting Chief [Thomas]  Stangrecki told WESA another reason for the reversal was to boost morale among the citys police ranks. He said hes received steady feedback that the ordinance is preventing them from doing their jobs.
    The officers who are employed here come here for a reason, and that’s to enforce the law, Stangrecki said. I thought it was imperative that I send out some strong messaging to the officers that are still here on this police force that you can do your job, you can enforce the law.

    On an episode of [u][link=https://www.wesa.fm/show/the-confluence/2023-01-11/one-year-into-pittsburgh-mayor-ed-gaineys-tenure-hes-looking-to-reduce-youth-violence]WESAs [/link][/u][i][u][link=https://www.wesa.fm/show/the-confluence/2023-01-11/one-year-into-pittsburgh-mayor-ed-gaineys-tenure-hes-looking-to-reduce-youth-violence]The Confluence[/link][/u][/i], Mayor Ed Gainey said he wanted to meet with Acting Chief Stangrecki to understand why police had reversed the policy. Gainey said the two plan to have a conversation in the near future, to help the mayor get a better understanding of the decision.

    [/QUOTE]
     

  • btomba_77

    Member
    January 16, 2023 at 5:52 am

    [link=https://www.axios.com/local/san-francisco/2023/01/13/low-level-traffic-stops-restriction-san-francisco-police?utm_campaign=editorial&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter]https://www.axios.com/loc…amp;utm_source=twitter[/link]

    [h1]San Francisco step closer to restricting low-level traffic stops[/h1]

    San Francisco’s Police Commission, which oversees the Police Department, this week voted 4-2 to limit police officers from making certain low-level traffic stops.

    The “[link=https://sf.gov/sites/default/files/2023-01/PoliceCommission11123-DGO%209.07_12.28.22_CLEAN.pdf]pretext stops” policy[/link] limits members of the San Francisco Police Department from stopping people for nine specific low-level offenses.


    The policy is an attempt to reduce incidents of racial profiling by police.

    [/QUOTE]
    We’ll see if SFPD goes the western PA route and just ignores it.
     

    • btomba_77

      Member
      April 12, 2023 at 8:53 am

      I’m dergon and I approve this message:

      [h2][link=https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2023/04/12/writing-race-topic-matters/]You cannot love America and avoid the topic of race[/link][/h2]

      Race isnt the problem with the American experiment so much as it is the best indicator of the experiments structural problems. Consider slavery: Its not the nations original sin because a significant number of White Americans enslaved Black people; it looms so large for America because the nation was supposedly founded on the idea of human equality yet allowed this grossest of inequalities to persist and expand.
       
      The criminal justice system doesnt need reform because it disproportionately confronts and punishes Black, Native and Hispanic Americans, but because abuse of power by the state should not be tolerated in a nation founded on the idea of government by and for the people all people.


       

      The racial inequalities we see in health care and education outcomes even when controlled for class do not exist because of Black Americans race or some imagined cultural carelessness, but because those systems are from a different era and poorly designed to account for Black peoples distinctive American journey. As structured, they hinder the ability to pursue happiness, stability and security unless they are tailored to the communities they serve. The democratic backsliding the nation is experiencing today is an indicator of the way race factored into the cultural, political and legislative conflicts of the past three decades.
       
       

      The nations trouble is not that it has a racist bone that simply needs removing but that it is disturbingly slow to recognize that racism is the sharp pain that helps us locate the fractures. I write about race because finding the fractures in our society and our democracy is a necessary step toward healing and strengthening, not destroying, the whole of the nation.


      I write about race because you cannot love America and avoid the issue. Yes, there are other topics some of critical importance but nothing reveals where the nation is most vulnerable like the question of race. If we want a United States that more fully realizes its potential, and I believe most of us do, fixing the structural flaws revealed by race presents the most promising path.

      [/QUOTE]