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  • Best telerad employer at present?

    Posted by Unknown Member on July 23, 2014 at 6:39 pm

    Telerad market has changed a lot in the last few years that I have been following it.  Now it’s time for me to pretty much decide… which of the Telerad companies are good to work for?  
     
    Which of the companies treat you fairly and give good/fair compensation for your work?
     
    Appreciate your help!

    gloriacazares replied 1 year ago 21 Members · 52 Replies
  • 52 Replies
  • jquinones8812_854

    Member
    July 24, 2014 at 8:05 am

    No such thing as ‘best’.
     
    Many provide different things, that could prove perfect for the right people.  Some are good, some are bad, most are in the middle. 

    • qi_si1988

      Member
      July 24, 2014 at 12:32 pm

      I don’t think I have ever known anybody who worked for more than one telerad…I wonder how many people out there actually have firsthand experience to make the comparison.

      • Unknown Member

        Deleted User
        July 25, 2014 at 10:14 am

        I have worked with three different telerad companies and can say they are all quite different. When choosing make sure you talk to as many of the currently employed radiologists as you can. They will give you the best insight into the pros and cons of their companies. Ask about their esprit du corps, mix of modalities they see, management style of the executives, client retention, and of course, salary and benefits. Personally, I have found Rays to be an outstanding company worth considering.

        • Unknown Member

          Deleted User
          July 26, 2014 at 6:01 am

          Sent a PM to you corad

          • Unknown Member

            Deleted User
            July 27, 2014 at 11:02 am

            Find me a practice; small, medium, or large who covers their telerad in-house, and I’ll find you the best telerad.  Plenty of actual practices looking to bring back the night.  Do the industry a favor and lean in that direction.

            • Unknown Member

              Deleted User
              July 27, 2014 at 11:44 am

              Quote from Rad-ical

              Find me a practice; small, medium, or large who covers their telerad in-house, and I’ll find you the best telerad.  Plenty of actual practices looking to bring back the night.  Do the industry a favor and lean in that direction.

               
               
              By what measure are these private in-sourcing groups the “best”?  
               
              Seems to me like all of these private groups are trying to exploit the bad job market… get a guy who will work only nights, not offer him partnership, get him to drive in to work every night to stay at the hospital….  The telerad companies at least let you work from comfort of your home and actually pay you similar to what these private groups are offering.
               
              I think it is these private groups that have to do the industry a big favor and start being more fair.  I would definitely lean the way of private practice and in sourcing, provided there were fair opportunities around!

              • Dr_Cocciolillo

                Member
                July 27, 2014 at 12:00 pm

                Try to cut a deal along the lines of I’m very interested on doing this but would like to be considered for day time partner position as soon as one opens up.

                The few 7 on 7 off positions I know of pay well but I don’t think that lifestyle is possible. Some of the ones that have been advertised on here have been complete garbage.

                Try diversified radiology in Colorado. Depending on your ski set, they may be interested.

                • Unknown Member

                  Deleted User
                  July 27, 2014 at 12:31 pm

                  Quote from wisdom

                  Try to cut a deal along the lines of I’m very interested on doing this but would like to be considered for day time partner position as soon as one opens up.

                  The few 7 on 7 off positions I know of pay well but I don’t think that lifestyle is possible. Some of the ones that have been advertised on here have been complete garbage.

                  Try diversified radiology in Colorado. Depending on your ski set, they may be interested.

                   
                  Thx wisdom.  sent you a pm.

              • sdhayden7_395

                Member
                July 27, 2014 at 12:15 pm

                I agree with you. I graduated in 2005. CAQ, blah-blah, fast reader, multiple modalities, love ER Radiology, currently am  a Hospital employee. Started looking for a new job. After reviewing a couple of offers for a night hawk from the private groups I also think that telerad is not that bad. The schedules proposed are not sustainable and just designed for people to leave after 1 year without becoming a partner.

                • Unknown Member

                  Deleted User
                  July 27, 2014 at 12:17 pm

                  Sonichedgehog — Mind sharing your experience?  Who is good to work for, stay away from… etc?  You can PM me if you want too!

                  • sdhayden7_395

                    Member
                    July 27, 2014 at 12:34 pm

                    My old partners are working for Vrad. After we were let go by the Hospital, they started working for Virtual Radiologic and its about 5-6 years now. I am not trying to advertise, honest! Thats just what I saw. Looks like there were cuts in pay, but there are good things too and they are not looking to get back to all the politics and other jazz. They travel, have multiple sites ( additional stations at their vacation homes) and looks like they can choose the number of hours they work. Granted, its also nights and weekends.  I am not sure what they are paid, but they look happy. They pay is obviously less than in PP, I probably will be looking for a substantial drop. But what other options are available really? Never thought it would happened. Box of chocolate..

                    • francomejiamurillo_751

                      Member
                      August 3, 2014 at 12:05 pm

                      Quote from Sonichedgehog

                      My old partners are working for Vrad. After we were let go by the Hospital, they started working for Virtual Radiologic and its about 5-6 years now. I am not trying to advertise, honest! Thats just what I saw. Looks like there were cuts in pay, but there are good things too and they are not looking to get back to all the politics and other jazz. They travel, have multiple sites ( additional stations at their vacation homes) and looks like they can choose the number of hours they work. Granted, its also nights and weekends.  I am not sure what they are paid, but they look happy. They pay is obviously less than in PP, I probably will be looking for a substantial drop. But what other options are available really? Never thought it would happened. Box of chocolate..

                       
                      Well, surely telerads is becoming a more legitimate option since we are graduating more residents each year.  If they can’t find jobs, where else can they go?
                       
                      Plus, with telerads at least you can live in the city you want.   There is an irony that after training, pediatrician/anesthesiologist/ ER/ urologist can go to any major city and work. 
                       
                      However, a radiologist (who doesn’t build patient clientele ) can’t go to any major city unless they do telerads.
                       
                       
                       
                       

                    • Unknown Member

                      Deleted User
                      August 4, 2014 at 12:54 am

                      Quote from Theforce111

                      Plus, with telerads at least you can live in the city you want.   There is an irony that after training, pediatrician/anesthesiologist/ ER/ urologist can go to any major city and work. 

                      However, a radiologist (who doesn’t build patient clientele ) can’t go to any major city unless they do telerads.

                       
                      While primary care has, generally more positions around the country, is it true that anesthesiologists and urologists can go to any major city and find work work?  And is it true that a radiologist can’t go to any major city unless they do telerads?   And how does a radiologist build up a patient clientele exactly? 
                       
                      It’s not all roses out there for us, but the grass isn’t that much greener on the other side. 
                       
                      If I wanted to get into a partnership track associate position in most any metropolitan area, I think I could do it. In the toughest job markets, it could take a few years, e.g. re-tooling in a fellowship at the regional academic center to establish some new contacts, some locums and per diem gigs to assess the landscape at the front lines and build a strong reputation for myself among the groups, but I think I’d be able to get in sooner or later, just a matter of time. Not as easy as it once was when groups would offer huge sign on bonuses and a magic carpet to fly to work on, but not so bad as you’d think reading some of the posts on this forum.
                       
                      My 2 cents. 
                       
                      I’m not averse to the idea of a telerad job in principle, but it just doesn’t seem to offer any lasting security, job satisfaction, or career development, things that are all important to me.
                       

                    • ka.amirzadeh

                      Member
                      August 4, 2014 at 4:08 am

                      As far as my decision process, I was thinking something like this…Live 600 miles from closest family. Love said family. Love where I/we live. LOVE VIR. Can’t do VIR here anymore. No close jobs. Don’t want to move. Looked into VRAD and several others. Make more money in ED with some flexibility in shifts, unlike telerad. No multiple privledges hassles. Found buyer for house in one day. Moving home to do ED. Doubles salary, 14 d/month. Frees me up to figure out my next VIR misadventure. [:)]

                    • sdhayden7_395

                      Member
                      August 4, 2014 at 6:49 am

                      Lucky Huggy[:D]! Its great!
                      And I would really like to work for private group. I like to know my colleagues and the referring Docs. Knowing them- what they expect- gives you an opportunity to provide better service/ expand the business. Its quite a thrill when once in a while you make this urgent call to the ER doc or to the Neurosurgeon/Surgeon and you know that you really made that important diagnosis that was not suspected before and changes the patient management. And when you make this call, the Docs believe you because they know you as a knowledgeable colleague.  I suppose it is still possible when /if I work for Telerad, but often the Docs are skeptical because the Telerad for them is just[i] a repor[/i]t on a paper that, lets be frank, is not always that great-looking.
                       
                      I understand the harsh business part of it : 7days on/7 off and a happy 26 week off a year: what a GREAT deal! But I doubt that the private groups would retain any of the people they sign on. The private groups just feed their competitors by driving away new grads and the experienced Rads who are looking for a job right into the arms of the Telerad companies. I believe that the groups if they are really interested to stay competitive should create ER sections with a reasonable schedule, competitive salary and a reasonable partnership tract. Lets be honest, the Night people provide them with the chance to have better quality of life. And really, if you have someone like that working for the group, and he/she is a competent Radiologist-its a great success for the Group. Otherwise its going to be a Nationwide Telerad Alliance pretty soon. And there will not be anyone to blame, but ourself.

                    • ka.amirzadeh

                      Member
                      August 5, 2014 at 6:02 am

                      But the only thing I think you may have missed is that I am going to work in the ED, seeing patients. I am returning to my first love so to speak. I do agree with you. The lack of jobs in general, particularly in our chosen fellowship training, particularly for the image guided folks, will further feed telerad.

                    • Unknown Member

                      Deleted User
                      August 13, 2014 at 9:52 pm

                      I am a 2014 (BE) grad in MSK fellowship with some significant geographic restrictions due to family. I am looking for PP Jobs in Florida but haven’t found much yet.  Telerads ( VRAD )  seems like a reasonable way to get  where I want to be until a PP gig opens up. I am just pretty nervous about the whole Tele thing b/c it seems like a hard way to start a career. 

                    • Unknown Member

                      Deleted User
                      August 14, 2014 at 12:37 am

                      Quote from EF300

                      I am a 2014 (BE) grad in MSK fellowship with some significant geographic restrictions due to family. I am looking for PP Jobs in Florida but haven’t found much yet.  Telerads ( VRAD )  seems like a reasonable way to get  where I want to be until a PP gig opens up. I am just pretty nervous about the whole Tele thing b/c it seems like a hard way to start a career. 

                       
                      Be careful. Changing your career later to a traditional pp model is not easy after you start with telerad.   

                    • Unknown Member

                      Deleted User
                      August 14, 2014 at 5:00 am

                      Thanks, what would be the main issues when moving from Tele to PP ?

                    • btomba_77

                      Member
                      August 14, 2014 at 5:07 am

                      Quote from EF300

                      Thanks, what would be the main issues when moving from Tele to PP ?

                      Stigma.   (Radiologists who do telerad have traditionally been considered to be of 1 of 3 types: 1) Older guy ready to back down his work load, 2) Guy who wants to choose lifestyle and location over group work (and hence maybe not a good fit for PP in the practice), 3) Guy who is unwilling/unable to make the social/professional accomodations to work as a “team player” in a group situation and therefore chooses telerad out of individualism (also maybe a bad fit for a group)   )
                       
                      &
                       
                      Lots of prior credentials and licenses make your on-boarding a bit more complicated.
                       
                       
                       
                      This might be changing over time, especially as many new graduates who, if they had their choice would have chosen traditional PP but instead were forced into telerad/nighthawk jobs out of necessity.   The above is just provided as something to consider.

                    • ka.amirzadeh

                      Member
                      August 14, 2014 at 7:26 am

                      I agree with Dergon, I was also a little worried about credentialling at 50 hospitals prior to getting to read. There were a few contractual related things that I won’t get into, but one was the cost of credentialling and who bears it which is definitelysomething to consider as you continue to look for a good PP job. Especially if you want something in the next three years. That is why I chose to go my route. Most ED work is sustainable and unassociated with noncompetes or credentialling costs in my part of the worg. Some may argue the same three arguements as I am looking for a more suitable VIR job, but so be it. The rads job market sux.

                    • Unknown Member

                      Deleted User
                      August 14, 2014 at 10:52 am

                      Quote from dergon

                      Quote from EF300

                      Thanks, what would be the main issues when moving from Tele to PP ?

                      Stigma.   (Radiologists who do telerad have traditionally been considered to be of 1 of 3 types: 1) Older guy ready to back down his work load, 2) Guy who wants to choose lifestyle and location over group work (and hence maybe not a good fit for PP in the practice), 3) Guy who is unwilling/unable to make the social/professional accomodations to work as a “team player” in a group situation and therefore chooses telerad out of individualism (also maybe a bad fit for a group)   )

                      &

                      Lots of prior credentials and licenses make your on-boarding a bit more complicated.

                      This might be changing over time, especially as many new graduates who, if they had their choice would have chosen traditional PP but instead were forced into telerad/nighthawk jobs out of necessity.   The above is just provided as something to consider.

                       
                      +1
                       
                      Residency/fellowship does not train you to be a great radiologist. It simply gets you ready to start your first job. There is much to learn about the practice of community radiology and academic radiology – two different types of radiology – that is learned on the job and not taught in residency/fellowship. This ranges from technical aspects of interpretation – i.e. ongoing learning that occurs as you see more and more cases and talk to clinicians and get feedback on your reads and do reading on the side – to non-interpretive skills like researching and developing protocols, working with the technologists, building rapport with clinicians and how to cater to their needs, how to be a team player in a group of varied individuals, and possibly management and leadership skills in how to keep a group of radiologists cohesive and maintain their morale and sense of belonging to a “Group,” etc. 
                       
                      When someone is three or four years out from fellowship and has been working for a teleradiology group during that time, and they are compared to another applicant who has been with a solid PP group for the same amount of time and now is head of MRI in his/her group or runs the breast imaging center or has helped the group acquire a new contract, all the while being comfortable with the gamut of radiology i.e. slinging barium to breast biopsies to thoras to reading knee MRIs and CT temporal bones and OB ultrasound… you can understand why I would rather hire the latter over former.
                       
                      Lastly – and others here know more about this than me – I’ve heard that if you are coming out of training and haven’t collect multiple state licenses, when you sign onto a large telerad company they will credential you in the needed states but you sign some sort of agreement to work for a certain period of time otherwise you have to pay them for their credentialing work. In other words, it’s not like you can work for 12 to 18 months with them and then jump ship to take a PP job, you are locked in for a while.
                       
                      To be honest, the prospect of a teleradiology lifestyle was one reason I chose radiology in the first place. When I got closer to job hunting and talked to more people, I was really disappointed that teleradiology was not a good fit for me and did not provide a lot of what I wanted out of a career, as the flexibility appealed to me. Bottom line for me was that teleradiology seemed to be more of a “gig” than a career.
                       
                      Anyway, I apologize for going off on a tangent and turning this into another  “Flounce’s take on teleradiology” post.

                    • Unknown Member

                      Deleted User
                      August 14, 2014 at 11:15 am

                      +1 for dergon and flounce. Spot on. Dergon for why telerad tends to have a “type” and flounce for CRITICAL (and correct IMHO) analysis of what groups want in a rad.  Like doing telework with *any* job, actually, tele-work tends to stunt your career at the level you started doing the tele-work. Obviously that’s not always the case, and you can mitigate the effect by doing CME, staying involved with a local academic center, being smart, etc., but there’s only so far you can go. 

                    • leboyd1

                      Member
                      August 19, 2014 at 7:22 pm

                      The last few posts are missing a critical “4th type” of teleradiologist in the current market. I worked in a small private group for 12 years, doing everything, reading everything, participating in hospital governance in multiple positions. I loved my group, the techs, the staff. I did a few locums stints and, without sounding like a jerk, the tech liked me better than their own rads.

                      But my hospital closed and the group nearby took our business without hiring me (despite having all the referring docs liking my group better, but they have the contract) I have kids in high and middle school and while I would move of there was something great, trying to find a private group, without a fellowship, these days is very hard. I didn’t do a fellowship since I wanted to do everything in a small hospital group and that was not unusual back then. Now groups cross you off the list as your CV comes in just because you don’t have a fellowship (or two these days), as if reading an ER head needs a Neuro guy or a knee MR needs an MSK. Give me a break. Or maybe they prefer taking the new grad to grind them up. I don’t know. But with my resume and experience, I was very disillusioned by the attitude of many of the groups out there right now.

                      But, ironically, telerad was very happy to have me. They had me take a CT reading test and did well enough, along with my credenatials, to be hired right away. So perhaps telerad will turn out to be a more democratic type of practice. Read something, get paid a standard rate. Read fast, make more. Read less, make less. No picking and choosing. No sloughing a procedure off on the next guy. And We all know that telerad is under the microscope all the time, so if you are good quality, that is readily apparent – I absolutely know that if many of the local rads around here were put under the same microscope as they put telerads they use, then it would be eye opening.

                      But I do absolutely agree that truly new grads who want to eventually go into PP probably should think long and hard about the choice. There is nothing to replace those first few years of learning to read on your own, make your own calls, doing procedures and running the show. And honing mammo skills, keeping up the numbers. The credentials arguements is cop out. So are you going to tell me that just because someone has 50 hospitals on their list, that they wouldn’t be hired even if they were a great fit and had geographic ties for a certain group? That would be very short sighted.

                      So the folks thinking about it, With the tough market and the fact that a lot of PP groups are apparently taking advantage of that fact, then if telerad is the best fit for family reasons or some other reason geographically, just do it.

                    • gloriacazares

                      Member
                      May 8, 2023 at 10:57 am

                      My wife is a subspecialist in one of the fields mentioned above. She can’t get a job where we want to be.

                      There are multiple openings in that city I could take if I wanted.

                      Honestly if we wind up back there, I’ll probably do tele though

                      Better lifestyle

                  • sdhayden7_395

                    Member
                    July 27, 2014 at 12:38 pm

                    I will pm you if I get more info. Good luck!
                     

                    • Unknown Member

                      Deleted User
                      July 27, 2014 at 12:52 pm

                      Thank you so much for your input Sonic!  Will keep it in mind for sure!

                    • ka.amirzadeh

                      Member
                      July 27, 2014 at 2:40 pm

                      You guys are depressing me….Thank God I can still do ED, which is where my happy ass will be before ever doing 100% diagnostic.

                    • qi_si1988

                      Member
                      July 27, 2014 at 2:54 pm

                      3+ years into vRad after PP myself…mostly because the PPs and hospitals in my area suck if you are not already at the top of the heap, and I had no interest in moving. vR did have some cutbacks, as did much of radiology, but there were improvements too. Overall, no complaints…I’m sure I could have done far worse.

                    • Unknown Member

                      Deleted User
                      July 27, 2014 at 3:15 pm

                      DocESP – sent you a PM!

                    • leboyd1

                      Member
                      August 3, 2014 at 11:35 am

                      As a rad who signed on with vRad and is getting ready to start soon, happy to see folks positive on telerad experience. I was in a great small PP group when the hospital finances collapsed around us and we were out on the street. Didn’t want to move, so making the trade of nights/weekends and probably less salary (our salary was moving markedly downward last two years) for flexibility, support and no more admin stuff unless I choose to.

  • satishkumaravula04

    Member
    August 19, 2014 at 9:17 pm

    I have worked for VRAD for 4 years and can confidently say that it is NOT a good place to come to out of residency. The pace, pathology and scope of cases really requires some PP time under your belt. I would have failed miserably had I come here straight from residency.
     
    As for which one is the best, that is a loaded question. I have a colleague who left VRAD and works for RAYS and loves it. I can only speak about VRAD and can say that I absolutely love it and would never consider going back into PP for various reasons. I am master of my time, have great virtual colleagues and see incredible pathology nightly. Vrad has monthly CME virtual lectures and and a fantastic 3 days academic conference in Vegas every year open to all radiologists. Not sure what other telerad groups do for cme, case sharing etc.
     
    Those that I know who have left VRAD have had no problem securing PP jobs so i assume the credentialing issue is not as significant as people make it out to be.
     
    As for prior comments about the “type” of people who go into telerad – Nonsense. Some do fit those categories, others just get tired of PP politics, being underpaid and under appreciated or having unpleasant partners. The personal physician relationships and collaboration that made my early career so rewarding are difficult to find today. Lifestyle is an ENORMOUS bonus – personally I have worked overseas for 6 months and in hawaii for two 3 month blocks of time. 
     
    I agree with RADjob4me – that post sums things up nicely

    • jesusr

      Member
      August 20, 2014 at 1:14 am

      Agree with the 2 previous posts. I work in a small size Telerad group. Generally speaking I don’t recommend starting your first job in telerad. You need a bit more experience to be fast and accurate. Having said that we hired a new grad Neuro 2 years ago and he was just fine.  The credentialing issue and problem returning to PP is not as important. I work some locum and yes it may take longer to get credential for hospitals but if they need you they give you temporary privilege. For imaging centers that is not an issue. One potential problem no one mentioned is that you may loose some skills. Some of my partners can not do any procedure or Flouro any more so it is difficult for them to go back to PP. That is one other reason I do locum so I see and do everything (except mammo and vascular IR). Good luck to you.

  • ian.schnepf_556

    Member
    August 22, 2014 at 10:09 pm

    more importantly, any telerad companies to avoid? i am trying to decide between a private practice nitehawk job and telerad at home. am concerned about future of telerad with more companies using their own in house coverage to save money. any thoughts?

    • Unknown Member

      Deleted User
      August 22, 2014 at 10:44 pm

      In my area, groups are doing their own nighthawk one after the other. There are two different approaches: Either assign a few weeks of night float to each member (and some people may sell their night shifts to more junior members) or groups hire their own dedicated nighthawk person. 
       
      I don’t think telerad is a growing business. In fact, in my area it is the opposite trend. Though there has been some occasions that telerad has replaced the existing group, it is much easier for the existing group to get rid of the telerad contract. Esp in desirable areas, it is not hard to hire your own dedicated nighthawk. Also many groups are afraid of losing their contract, so they are fine with working a few weeks per year. 
       
      It all depends on the situation. But if you work as a nighthawk in a stable pp group, once there is an opening, you have the best chance to get that position. If a group hires its own nighthawk, it is very likely that it is a relatively large group and is stable. Larger groups have higher likelihood of a job opening.
       
      If you and your family are fine with you working nights, then it is a better option. 

      • qi_si1988

        Member
        August 22, 2014 at 11:25 pm

        About 1-1.5 years ago, in response to yet another round of reimbursement cuts, there was a wave of groups stopping usage of tele, in the hope that they would recoup enough to avoid any painful personal cuts in income. Telerad companies like vRad had a few leaner months…until the majority of those “take back the night” groups rediscovered that, yeah, they hated working nights as much as they remembered. And many proceeded to sign back up for tele coverage.

        • Unknown Member

          Deleted User
          October 10, 2014 at 4:46 pm

          I have worked for 3 teleradiology companies over the course of my career, both large and small. This is the path for me. I think it’s very important to do a lot of research and heavily weigh the pros and cons of each company. There is no best solution. I would personally stay away from the large corporate run companies (vRad). They do NOT care about you as a radiologist. While their medical directors may individually care, they have little power over the leaders of the company and their choices. They are tied and essentially serve as a buffer between you, the radiologist, and the higher ups. If you can handle the stress of forced contract changes and pay cuts (take it or you’re terminated) on a regular basis then perhaps the efficient work system would be worth it. But personally, I couldn’t handle being treated that way. Don’t believe that it won’t happen again because it’s happened over and over and over again. It’s a ruthless model. The smaller companies for the most part care about you and treat you like a human being. They care about your time and work with you to help get time off. The bosses are more approachable and take into consideration your needs and your feedback, sometimes effecting some change in the company. This will never happen in a giant corporate structure because you are replaceable. 

          • cody.a.keller_68

            Member
            May 7, 2023 at 10:48 am

            Resurrecting this thread as I’m looking to leave PP after 20 yrs for dedicated daytime work hrs. Would love to hear from those of you who are or recently have worked for a teleradiology group. I’ve searched this site but haven’t found much recent info aside from “don’t work for vrad” etc from people who don’t seem to actually have worked there. please only respond if you have firsthand info. Looking for weekday work as a body imager, willing to do a hybrid for a PP where i also come in a few days. I understand that most of the demand is for after hrs work. Interested in learning more about specific companies. There are a ton on the ACR site and it’s hard to figure out which are the favorable ones. Thanks.

            • consuldreugenio

              Member
              May 7, 2023 at 11:28 am

              I hear multiple academic hospitals are employing daytime telerads for subspecialty shifts. Will probably pay the most/$wrvu. Studies may not even be that bad if the sites covered are the community sites and not the cancer centers. You should probably contact these practices first. One example is CCF I believe.

              • cody.a.keller_68

                Member
                May 7, 2023 at 11:57 am

                Thanks! I’ve heard some of the univ hospitals are doing that. What is CCF?

                • btomba_77

                  Member
                  May 7, 2023 at 12:18 pm

                  Quote from zeak

                  Thanks! I’ve heard some of the univ hospitals are doing that. What is CCF?

                   
                  Cleveland Clinic (Foundation)

                • beatsluver152_896

                  Member
                  May 7, 2023 at 1:37 pm

                  Zeak – 
                  Good topic to re-visit.
                  1. Must talk with rads who work with at least three tele companies. best way to compare and contrast.
                  2. Lots of PP now have tele-positions worth looking at. You can approach alot of PP with your demands and see if they jibe with their needs.
                  3. Can only speak about vRad – been here 13 yrs. seen the good, bad and ugly – PP me for more details. Pay is increasing as is schedule flexibility. lots of cool extras – CME, yearly conference, charity etc. Pay – you earn what you are worth and what you read – plain and simple. Weekday work for body imager — best to go to PP and cut your own deal. Not a ton of that at vRad unless you live in guam or eastern europe.

                  • Unknown Member

                    Deleted User
                    May 7, 2023 at 2:22 pm

                    No wayyou dont earn what you are worth at Vrad

                    Post your rates per actual wRVU (not the garbage internal metric) to prove it

                    • mwakamiya

                      Member
                      May 7, 2023 at 3:36 pm

                      If you want to join Vrad — slice your own gonads off with a dull, rusty knife and stick them in a pickle jar. Just be aware in this specific thread, some messages are almost 10 years old, thus not applicable to real life right now. 

                  • marciorka

                    Member
                    May 7, 2023 at 6:46 pm

                    What do you mean by mentioning living at Eastern Europe? Can you work from europe for vrad?! Thanks!
                     

                    Quote from La Dolce Vita

                    Zeak – 
                    Good topic to re-visit.
                    1. Must talk with rads who work with at least three tele companies. best way to compare and contrast.
                    2. Lots of PP now have tele-positions worth looking at. You can approach alot of PP with your demands and see if they jibe with their needs.
                    3. Can only speak about vRad – been here 13 yrs. seen the good, bad and ugly – PP me for more details. Pay is increasing as is schedule flexibility. lots of cool extras – CME, yearly conference, charity etc. Pay – you earn what you are worth and what you read – plain and simple. Weekday work for body imager — best to go to PP and cut your own deal. Not a ton of that at vRad unless you live in guam or eastern europe.

                    • ipadfawazipad_778

                      Member
                      May 7, 2023 at 7:22 pm

                      Isnt Vrad now RP?

                    • mwakamiya

                      Member
                      May 8, 2023 at 6:24 am

                      yes, VRAD is now RP. 

                    • beatsluver152_896

                      Member
                      May 8, 2023 at 7:07 am

                      Yes – vRad is owned by RP – a physician owner but PE backed company.
                       
                      Yes – You can read from anywhere – there are special circumstances and can only read prelims overseas. Have read overseas for over 7 month total. Some rads live in puerto rico 1/2 the year and reap huge tax benefits. 
                      Pirate-rad – you are correct (about the age of the original post, not about your surgical technique). 
                       
                      Seagull – You earn exactly how much you “kill” – there are so many factors to consider which have been covered in prior threads multiple times. Types of cases, differential pay scale based on time you read, what you read, speed of using RIS/PACS, independent contractor status tax benefits, schedule flexibility, shift flexibility and on and on and on. All of these factors determine your final take home pay…..
                      Straight up pay – PP is surely better. Benefits – vRad is essentially useless if you go the IC route. Potential for big return if you buy in – PP is surely the way to go.
                       
                      No politics, headaches, paperwork, commute, asshole cherry picking partners, obnoxious techs, angry clinicians, bad administration, increased family time, autonomy….vRad kicks ass…… different strokes for different folks…..

                    • Unknown Member

                      Deleted User
                      May 8, 2023 at 8:33 am

                      As the one responsible for staffing 12 private practices with over 250 rads I constantly have ads running and emails going out.  I probably talk to more radiologists across the country than anyone so I have a good feel for what the market is like.  I can tell you truthfully that there is not a lot of movement geographically for experienced radiologists.  I get 10 responses asking if the group will consider remote than I do legitimate onsite candidates.  Many of our groups are rapidly growing so some of them have embraced the dedicated remote radiologist working either a full-time day or 7-7 schedule.  These are employed positions with established groups working a set number of shifts, earning a competitive salary with full benefits.  I signed 19 radiologists last year in these types of positions.  Most of my candidates are highly experienced radiologists who have been with their private practices for years.  They are unhappy for a multitude of reasons but they are locked geographically for family reasons and there are no good private practice options locally.  I have filled every remote position for our groups who decide to go this route.  And it works for the group too.  There is a definitive delta between onsite and remote pay and the remote Radiologist does not get a vote.  But they are paid higher than most telerad companies when you don’t take production into account.  We are aiming for security and inclusiveness rather than a hired gun on a pay per click model like the companies.  
                       
                      I believe the idea of a dedicated remote radiologist for private practices will become much more prevalent as the shortage continues.  You just have to create the right model which works for both parties.  I also do not believe a fellow should jump in to teleradiology right out of training.  I believe they are putting themselves at a distinct disadvantage in the long term.  I would hire an experienced radiologist with no fellowship than a fellow coming out of one of the best programs for a teleradiology job.  Not because the fellow is not qualified but because IMHO it is not the right thing to do.  Another good aspect of working as a remote radiologist for a private practice is the minimal licensing and credentialing over a teleradiology company.  Most groups will have 3-5 hospitals and one license requirement.   

                    • beatsluver152_896

                      Member
                      May 8, 2023 at 9:23 am

                      Daniel — Thanks so much for the market insight. Great stuff. Agree agree agree !!! – Some PP are even showing some schedule flexibility and not all 7 on 7 off.

                    • mwakamiya

                      Member
                      May 8, 2023 at 9:50 am

                      Mr. Corbett brings up many valid points. 
                      One item I would like to emphasize is the credentialing nightmare that follows you for the rest of your working career AFTER you join and then leave a telerad sweat shop, slave labor outfit. It is the next stage in your life/job balance when the 20+ state licenses and 50-100+ hospital credentialing history follows you around like a bad case of HPV. If you get nicked for any type of disciplinary action by peer review, one of the many state licensing boards or are involved in a lawsuit — forget about it. 

                • cody.a.keller_68

                  Member
                  May 8, 2023 at 6:04 am

                  Thanks for all the info.