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  • Alan Watts life story of a Doc

    Posted by afazio.uk_887 on July 26, 2023 at 12:14 pm

     
    Does this not ring so true for all of us who have pursued becoming a physician?  
    [link=https://youtube.com/shorts/PYBx8SfXg44?feature=share]https://youtube.com/short..Bx8SfXg44?feature=share[/link]
     
    I feel this way also about financial goals now. 
     
     

    tdetlie_105 replied 12 months ago 5 Members · 7 Replies
  • 7 Replies
  • Unknown Member

    Deleted User
    July 26, 2023 at 2:03 pm

    Great share, thanks. This is about the rat race. Delayed gratification. Everytime you get close to your goal, you move the milestone a bit further down. You never really let yourself be happy. What an a**hole we can be to ourselves, no? 
     
    We think it is the only way to motivate ourselves. As if the alternative would be to sit at home and never work hard and enjoy nintendo and ice cream all day. 
     
    Living in the moment and letting yourself be happy – and KNOWING that this is enough to be happy if you let yourself be happy, if you make your happiness – is not mutually exclusive with being a hard charger. Hard charger is good. I take my youth group ruck marching, we get deep into the mental weeds beyond our comfort zone, where there is only pain with each step and new sweat upon cold sweat and grime and only suck and nagging voice in your head telling you that you’ve done good enough and need to stop, but you have gotten skilled in arguing with that voice and plowing forward and savoring the suck because you haven’t reached your predetermined objective and none of the warning lights have come on yet. That grit and desire to push on is not mutually exclusive with realizing that the valley you are in is already the promised the land and you have chosen to do something good and you own it. 
     
    Just as every stage in your child’s life from 3 months to 3 years to 10 years to 15 years to 25 years etc has their own special and unique joys to savor as a parent, i.e. you would not think “are we there yet?” but want to enjoy that step of the journey, so it goes with your own life from high school up through med school and residency and associate and partner. Seize the day, enjoy the moment, savor the “problems” of the hour, we create our joy where we stand and are not passive recipients waiting for it to be granted. 
     

  • tdetlie_105

    Member
    July 26, 2023 at 5:45 pm

    Quote from Waduh Dong

     
    Does this not ring so true for all of us who have pursued becoming a physician?  
    [link=https://youtube.com/shorts/PYBx8SfXg44?feature=share]https://youtube.com/short..Bx8SfXg44?feature=share[/link]

    I feel this way also about financial goals now. 

     
    Great post.  We are however all/mostly all afflicted by the same disease so this will likely fall upon deaf hears.  Thank you for posting. 

    • afazio.uk_887

      Member
      July 26, 2023 at 6:11 pm

       
      I’m a big fan of Alan Watts.   

      • mgmacielendocrino_912

        Member
        July 26, 2023 at 7:55 pm

        Alan Watts is so amazing at articulating the problems of modern times, especially amongst the worried well. He studied ancient Hindu and Buddhist philosophy and brought it to the west back in the 50s and 60s. This ancient wisdom is timeless and continues to resonate strongly in this age of social media.

        Inzo made a spectacular song out of Alan Watt’s work:

        [link]https://youtu.be/luQSQuCHtcI[/link]

      • tdetlie_105

        Member
        July 26, 2023 at 7:58 pm

        Quote from Waduh Dong

         
        I’m a big fan of Alan Watts.   

         
        I know the name well but not the details of his work.  What little I do know resonates as universal wisdom and truth (disclaimer: I’m no where near any sort of enlightenment and am as delusional/lost as everyone else).

  • aldoctc

    Member
    July 27, 2023 at 6:20 am

    Quote from Waduh Dong

    Does this not ring so true for all of us who have pursued becoming a physician?  
    [link=https://youtube.com/shorts/PYBx8SfXg44?feature=share]https://youtube.com/short..Bx8SfXg44?feature=share[/link]

    I feel this way also about financial goals now. 

     
    I’ve certainly seen it ring true for many people during the course of my life.  My ex-wife was certainly like this in the sense that she was perpetually dissatisfied and always striving.  When we were both young and striving, we meshed well; as we aged and I became content, she did not.  For other people I’ve known, it’s been heartbreaking at times to see them adopt maladaptive behaviors such as drinking, drugs, affairs, and even criminal pursuits in response to a mid-life crisis.  In my mid-30s I had the thought that the striving had served me well to that point, but that it was time to seek other avenues for validation.  
     
    I’ve been lucky in that I’ve always enjoyed the process of learning, was born to parents that encouraged and facilitated that, attended well-functioning educational institutions that challenged me, and realized early on enough that the path I’d chosen for a career (synthetic organic chemistry) wasn’t going to get me the lifestyle I wanted.  Radiology has been a great career for me and I’m grateful.  
     
    Most docs, and certainly radiologists are ‘born on third base’ when it comes to finances.  My observation is that financial anxiety and/or peril for docs usually boils down to a combination of poor financial choices (oil wells in Venezuela, opening a restaurant, multiple divorces, etc.) and/or ‘keeping up with the Joneses.’  So, in keeping with the baseball analogy, I’ve tried to avoid the triple plays in life and choose my team-mates thoughtfully over the course of my life.  Somewhere along the line, I picked up the following priority list:  People, then experiences, then money, then things.  Has worked for me.  
     
    Finally, realize that for 90% of humanity today and 99+% of humanity throughout history, “living in the moment” has mostly been trying to answer the question “How do I survive RIGHT NOW?”  When faced with food/water insecurity, disease, war, and other hostile environments, the question “What is the meaning of life?” fades quickly into obscurity.  
     

    • tdetlie_105

      Member
      July 27, 2023 at 10:07 am

      Quote from Dr. Joseph Mama

      Quote from Waduh Dong

      Does this not ring so true for all of us who have pursued becoming a physician?  
      [link=https://youtube.com/shorts/PYBx8SfXg44?feature=share]https://youtube.com/short..Bx8SfXg44?feature=share[/link]

      I feel this way also about financial goals now. 

      I’ve certainly seen it ring true for many people during the course of my life.  My ex-wife was certainly like this in the sense that she was perpetually dissatisfied and always striving.  When we were both young and striving, we meshed well; as we aged and I became content, she did not.  For other people I’ve known, it’s been heartbreaking at times to see them adopt maladaptive behaviors such as drinking, drugs, affairs, and even criminal pursuits in response to a mid-life crisis.  In my mid-30s I had the thought that the striving had served me well to that point, but that it was time to seek other avenues for validation.  

      I’ve been lucky in that I’ve always enjoyed the process of learning, was born to parents that encouraged and facilitated that, attended well-functioning educational institutions that challenged me, and realized early on enough that the path I’d chosen for a career (synthetic organic chemistry) wasn’t going to get me the lifestyle I wanted.  Radiology has been a great career for me and I’m grateful.  

      Most docs, and certainly radiologists are ‘born on third base’ when it comes to finances.  My observation is that financial anxiety and/or peril for docs usually boils down to a combination of poor financial choices (oil wells in Venezuela, opening a restaurant, multiple divorces, etc.) and/or ‘keeping up with the Joneses.’  So, in keeping with the baseball analogy, I’ve tried to avoid the triple plays in life and choose my team-mates thoughtfully over the course of my life.  Somewhere along the line, I picked up the following priority list:  People, then experiences, then money, then things.  Has worked for me.  

      Finally, realize that for 90% of humanity today and 99+% of humanity throughout history, “living in the moment” has mostly been trying to answer the question “How do I survive RIGHT NOW?”  When faced with food/water insecurity, disease, war, and other hostile environments, the question “What is the meaning of life?” fades quickly into obscurity.  

       
      Great stuff…Fundamentally, it’s all about intrinsic vs extrinsic goals, over-identification with our minds/ego, and what “currency” is one choosing to define their lives by.  Money/status/appearance are currency defaults that we use too often to define ourselves and our lives.  Internet/tech/capitalism help propagate this Mindset of More…Your last point really resonated with me. I’ve read/listened to several books that touch upon evolutionary psych, and based on our hardwiring/neurotransmitters (especially Dopamine), our stone-age brains/biology are rigged against us (apparently this is termed evolutionary mismatch)…The luxury (and curse) of modern living is that it takes us away from having to live in the moment which is key to becoming whole.  Many great spiritual traditions/religions teach this in various forms.  At times I wonder if “Man’s Fall from Grace” somehow corresponds to a time when this evolutionary shift started to take place.